Pasquale Barile

Pasquale Barile, freelance egyptologist and writer, deals with ancient languages and genesis of civilization. Founder and President of the Ancient World Society and HistoryLab, conducts an intensive research, divulging and teaching activity in history. He is a member of the EES (Egypt Exploration Society) and SE (Société d'Égyptologie). He lives in Bologna, Italy.
  • First infertility diagnosis made 4,000 years ago discovered in cuneiform tablet in Turkey

    The first diagnosis to determine infertility was made 4,000 years ago, an ancient Assyrian clay tablet discovered by Turkish researchers in central Kayseri province revealed Thursday. Various researchers from different universities led by Şanlıurfa’s Harran University examined a 4,000-year-old Assyrian tablet containing a prenuptial agreement and found out that the first infertility diagnosis was made in central Kayseri province’s Kültepe…

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  • European Hunter-Gatherers Interbred With Farmers From the Near East

    The Neolithic Period, which lasted from about 9,000 to 3,000 BC, often seems as mysterious as the famous megaliths associated with it, such as Stonehenge in England and Ggantija in Malta. It included, however, one of the most important shifts in human history: the gradual transition from hunter-gatherer groups to farming communities. Early populations from Europe and the Near East…

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  • Poisoned, Then Buried: Before Vesuvius, Toxic Water Likely Sickened Pompeii

    When Mount Vesuvius in southwestern Italy erupted in A.D. 79, it engulfed the city of Pompeii so quickly that residents barely had time to react to the impending disaster before it killed them. Their final moments were frozen in time as people were buried in layers of hot ash, their lives snuffed out in moments. But even before the volcanic…

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  • Cambridge academics uncover 2,000-year-old Roman sundial

    Researchers from the University of Cambridge made the find during an excavation in the Roman town of Interamna Lirenas, near Monte Cassino. Inscribed on the sundial is the name Marcus Novius Tubula, an unknown plebeian tribune to Rome, in Latin. It is claimed this sheds new light on Rome’s relationship with other regions. Interamna Lirenas, founded in 312 BC and…

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  • 2,000-year-old luxury baths discovered in NE China

    Archaeologists recently found three 2,000-year-old luxury baths in northwest China’s city of Xi’an, the local heritage department said Monday. Three ancient city sites, dating back to different dynasties, were discovered by a team at an archeological site at the ancient city of Liyang, according to Liu Rui, a researcher on the team. Liyang, a former capital in the Qin and…

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  • A Grecian Artifact Evokes Tales From the ‘Iliad’ and ‘Odyssey’

    Two years ago, archaeologists excavating an ancient grave at Pylos in southwestern Greece pulled out a grime-encrusted object, less than an inch and half long, that looked like some kind of large bead. They put it aside to focus on more prominent items, like gold rings, that also were packed into the rich grave. But later, as a conservator removed…

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  • First Hellenistic gymnasium in Egypt discovered at Watfa village in Fayoum

    A German-Egyptian archaeological mission has discovered the first Hellenistic gymnasium ever found in Egypt, located at Medinat Watfa, in the northwest of Fayoum Oasis. The mission from the German Archaeological Institute (DAI), headed by Professor Cornelia Römer, made the discovery as part of its ongoing excavations at the Watfa site. Watfa is the location of the ancient village Philoteris, founded…

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  • Chinese archaeologists discover cave-dwelling agrarian society

    Chinese archaeologists have found a large amount of carbonized rice grains in caves dating from the New Stone Age, challenging the conventional view that cave dwellers were solely hunter gathers and did not cultivate land for food. More than 10,000 grains were discovered at the No. 4 cave in the Nanshan ruins in east China’s Fujian Province, which dates back…

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  • This fascinating pre-Incan society, high-up in the Andes, lacked social hierarchies

    New evidence uncovered by archaeologists has shone a light on a pre-Incan society high up in the Andes, which did not have hierarchical social structures as is common today, and was instead built on power sharing and decentralised networks. The settlement, known as Borgatta, was built at some point in the tenth century in what is now Argentina, growing to…

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  • Cache of antique coins found in drawer at Scotney Castle

    In proper storybook style, in a disintegrating cardboard box shoved to the very back of a drawer, in a castle where every nook and cranny is still stuffed with the possessions of generations of hoarding owners, a cache of valuable antique coins, some extremely rare, has been discovered. Scotney Castle in Kent was left to the National Trust in 1970,…

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