Asia

Archaeological news from Asia.

  • First infertility diagnosis made 4,000 years ago discovered in cuneiform tablet in Turkey

    The first diagnosis to determine infertility was made 4,000 years ago, an ancient Assyrian clay tablet discovered by Turkish researchers in central Kayseri province revealed Thursday. Various researchers from different universities led by Şanlıurfa’s Harran University examined a 4,000-year-old Assyrian tablet containing a prenuptial agreement and found out that the first infertility diagnosis was made in central Kayseri province’s Kültepe…

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  • 2,000-year-old luxury baths discovered in NE China

    Archaeologists recently found three 2,000-year-old luxury baths in northwest China’s city of Xi’an, the local heritage department said Monday. Three ancient city sites, dating back to different dynasties, were discovered by a team at an archeological site at the ancient city of Liyang, according to Liu Rui, a researcher on the team. Liyang, a former capital in the Qin and…

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  • Chinese archaeologists discover cave-dwelling agrarian society

    Chinese archaeologists have found a large amount of carbonized rice grains in caves dating from the New Stone Age, challenging the conventional view that cave dwellers were solely hunter gathers and did not cultivate land for food. More than 10,000 grains were discovered at the No. 4 cave in the Nanshan ruins in east China’s Fujian Province, which dates back…

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  • 2,400-year-old horse and chariot pit unearthed in China

    Archaeologists in central China’s Henan Province have excavated a 2,400-year-old pit containing horses and chariots beside a tomb possibly belonging to a lord. The No. 3 Horse and Chariot Pit is one of a cluster of tombs belonging to noble families of the Zheng State, a vassal state during the Spring and Autumn (770-476 B.C) and Warring States periods (475-221…

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  • Ancient Skull May Be History’s Earliest Known Tsunami Victim

    In 1929, an Australian geologist named Paul S. Hossfeld was investigating the northern coast of Papua New Guinea for petroleum. He found bone fragments embedded in a creek bank about seven miles inland and about 170 feet above sea level. At first, Dr. Hossfeld believed that the specimen was from the skull of Homo erectus, an extinct relative of modern…

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  • 8,600-year-old bear statuette unearthed in Turkey’s Izmir

    Turkish archeologists have discovered an approximately 8,600-year-old bear statuette during excavation works in the Yeşilova Mound, in Turkey’s western province of Izmir. The Head of the Excavation Committee, Zafer Derin, reported that more than 200 important findings that reflect life in the Neolithic period were obtained during the excavations in the Yeşilova Mound, one of the oldest settlements near Izmir.…

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  • Unique 5,000 year old figurine with feather headdress found in old potato field in Novosibirsk

    The finds were made on a pre-historic burial site Turist-2 close to the east bank of the Ob River in Novosibirsk. The most sensational is a figurine made of an as yet unknown organic material featuring what appears to be a feather headdress. Or could it be a halo atop the head of a deity? Researchers will now work hard…

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  • Ancient child tombs found in China

    A total of 110 tombs dating back more than 2,000 years have been discovered in northern China’s Hebei province. The tombs were used to bury the remains of children, and archeologists estimate there might be 500 to 700 more such tombs in the surrounding area. The graveyard located near the Fudi city ruins in Huanghua, Hebei, is dated between the…

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  • Gilt-bronze Buddha triad found in Yangyang

    A standing gilt-bronze Buddha triad that is believed to be of the Three Kingdoms Period (57 B.C.-A.D. 668) was excavated around Jinjeon Temple’s Three-story Stone Pagoda in Yangyang, Gangwon, according to the Cultural Heritage Administration on Monday. The Buddha triad, which is presumed to have been made in the 6th century, is 8.7 centimeters (3.4 inches) tall. It features the…

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  • 2,000-year-old olive oil mill uncovered in Turkey’s Aegean region

    Archeologists have unearthed a 2,000-year-old olive oil mill in the ancient city of Tripolis in southwestern Turkey. Discovered in Turkey’s Aegean province of Denizli, the mill is expected to shed light on the rich olive history of the region, according to Doğan News Agency. The mill was uncovered during the excavation of an ancient agora. The mill room measures 3.5…

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