Europe

Archaeological news from Europe.

Poisoned, Then Buried: Before Vesuvius, Toxic Water Likely Sickened Pompeii

When Mount Vesuvius in southwestern Italy erupted in A.D. 79, it engulfed the city of Pompeii so quickly that residents barely had time to react to the impending disaster before it killed them. Their final moments were frozen in time as people were buried in layers of hot ash, their lives snuffed out in moments. But even before the volcanic…

Cambridge academics uncover 2,000-year-old Roman sundial

Researchers from the University of Cambridge made the find during an excavation in the Roman town of Interamna Lirenas, near Monte Cassino. Inscribed on the sundial is the name Marcus Novius Tubula, an unknown plebeian tribune to Rome, in Latin. It is claimed this sheds new light on Rome’s relationship with other regions. Interamna Lirenas, founded in 312 BC and…

A Grecian Artifact Evokes Tales From the ‘Iliad’ and ‘Odyssey’

Two years ago, archaeologists excavating an ancient grave at Pylos in southwestern Greece pulled out a grime-encrusted object, less than an inch and half long, that looked like some kind of large bead. They put it aside to focus on more prominent items, like gold rings, that also were packed into the rich grave. But later, as a conservator removed…

Cache of antique coins found in drawer at Scotney Castle

In proper storybook style, in a disintegrating cardboard box shoved to the very back of a drawer, in a castle where every nook and cranny is still stuffed with the possessions of generations of hoarding owners, a cache of valuable antique coins, some extremely rare, has been discovered. Scotney Castle in Kent was left to the National Trust in 1970,…

Haul of jewels and golden coins uncovered from 2,000-tear-old tombs

Archaeologists in Greece have uncovered rare jewels, coins and other artefacts while excavating tombs near the ruins of the classical city of Corinth dating to between the fourth and first centuries A.D. The team of experts, working with the Greek Ministry of Culture, made the discoveries in eastern Corinthia, at the site of the ancient village of Tenea, while excavating…

Archaeologists excavate 400 Iron Age houses in Denmark

The town of Jelling in Denmark is a unique archaeological treasure trove, with sites such as Jelling Church, the Jelling runic Stone, and two large burial mounds. Now, archaeologists have excavated an entire Iron Age (early Medieval) village. “We have had the opportunity to excavate almost 400 houses over six hectares. I think it’s truly special to find a village…

4th century sarcophagus found during excavations in Ljubljana

Archaeologist Martin Horvat from the Ljubljana Museums and Galleries (MGML) told the STA that a total of seven sarcophagi had been found during the works on the street, which connects Tivoli Park and Slovenska Street since September, but the one found today was the best preserved. Under the watchful eyes of numerous bystanders and photographers, the 4th century sarcophagus was…

Archaeologists find Alexander the Great, Lysimachus’ iron-making center, strategos residence under Thracian mound in southeast Bulgaria

Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,300-year-old facility for iron production and a provincial governor’s residence – which appear to have been used by Emperor Alexander the Great and his successor in Thrace, Lysimachus – underneath what originally seemed like an Ancient Thracian burial mound located near the town of Knyazhevo, Topolovgrad Municipality, in Southeast Bulgaria. The landscape of Southern (and Northeast)…

Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Theater of Thouria, Southern Greece

The first remains of the ancient city theater, which dates back to the 4th century BC, came to light during excavations in the summer of 2016. During excavations in the summer of 2017, archaeologists uncovered the perimeter of the theater’s orchestra and several rows of stone seats. The orchestra perimeter is 16.3 meters long and three parallel grooves around it…

Iron Age skeletal remains discovered on Irish coast after Storm Ophelia

The remains, found at Forlorn Point near Kilmore Quay in Co Wexford, are believed to be over 1,500 years old, according to the State Pathologist. The discovery of the complete human skeleton was made just one day after Storm Ophelia raged across Ireland. The remains were found at a beach by people out walking on Tuesday evening shortly before 5pm,…
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