Prehistory

All about the origins of mankind.

  • Stone age hunter-gatherers’ ‘paradise’ discovered next to major Israeli road

    Israeli archaeologists have uncovered next to one of the country’s busiest roads the site of an extraordinarily well preserved prehistoric “paradise” used by stone age hunter-gatherers over half a million years ago, who left behind evidence of hundreds of knapped flint hand-axes. The discovery at about a five-metre depth at Jaljulia, near the town of Kfar Saba, suggests that an…

    Read More »
  • Ancient cave in China filled with 45,000-year-old stone tools and animal bones, new excavation reveals

    Archaeologists have recovered thousands of artifacts from a cave in Xinjiang (an autonomous region of northern China) including stone tools, bronze and iron artifacts and animal fossils. Some date as far back as the Paleolithic Age, making them roughly 45,000 years old, according to the Institute of Archaeology at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. Around 2,000 artifacts were unearthed at the…

    Read More »
  • In the Bones of a Buried Child, Signs of a Massive Human Migration to the Americas

    The girl was just six weeks old when she died. Her body was buried on a bed of antler points and red ocher, and she lay undisturbed for 11,500 years. Archaeologists discovered her in an ancient burial pit in Alaska in 2010, and on Wednesday an international team of scientists reported they had retrieved the child’s genome from her remains.…

    Read More »
  • Ancient henge discovered in Yorkshire

    The circular monument lay hidden for centuries under farmland, its existence only hinted at in crop marks, spotted in aerial surveys. But over the past three months archeologists have been hard at work bringing to light what they believe could be East Yorkshire’s first Woodhenge – as in Stonehenge without the stone – at Little Catwick Quarry near Hornsea. And…

    Read More »
  • Ancient Axes, Spear Points May Reveal When Early Humans Left Africa

    More than 1,000 stone artifacts, some of which may be up to 1.76 million years old, have been discovered at Wadi Dabsa, in southwest Saudi Arabia near the Red Sea. The artifacts, which were found in what is now an arid landscape, date to a time when the climate was wetter; they may provide clues as to how and when…

    Read More »
  • 5,000-year-old “granary” found in east China

    A huge pile of carbonized unhusked rice dating back 5,000 years was found in the ruins of ancient Liangzhu City in eastern China’s Zhejiang Province. The pile was about 60 cm thick and covered about 5,000 square meters, the provincial institute of archaeology said Wednesday. The pile stored about 100,000 kg of carbonized rice. Liu Bin, head of the institute,…

    Read More »
  • Evidence of ‘special site’ for Bronze Age burials near Loch Ness

    A second 4,000-year-old grave has been located in an area being developed in Drumnadrochit where a stone-lined grave known as a cist was found in 2015. The discovery two years ago included human remains. The latest grave had filled with soil causing degradation to the pit, but a single Beaker pot was found. Archaeologists said the decorated pot may have…

    Read More »
  • Ancient settlement sought near Istanbul’s oldest burial site

    The metro excavation site located in Istanbul’s Beşiktaş district, where 3,500-year-old cairn-type sepulchers were discovered, is most likely home to an ancient settlement, the head of Istanbul’s Archaeological Museums said Monday. Excavation teams had discovered 35 ancient “kurgan-type” graves during construction works as part of an extension to Istanbul’s metro line. Kurgans are a type of burial place usually characterized…

    Read More »
  • Stone Age carved rocks discovered in Bornholm

    Danes often refer to the holiday destination of Bornholm as ‘the sunshine island’, so it is only fitting that a cache of rocks carved in the Stone Age, which were recently excavated on the Danish island, have been dubbed ‘sun stones’. The small stones are covered with designs carved by Stone Age people 5,000 years ago. The approximately 300 stones and…

    Read More »
  • European Hunter-Gatherers Interbred With Farmers From the Near East

    The Neolithic Period, which lasted from about 9,000 to 3,000 BC, often seems as mysterious as the famous megaliths associated with it, such as Stonehenge in England and Ggantija in Malta. It included, however, one of the most important shifts in human history: the gradual transition from hunter-gatherer groups to farming communities. Early populations from Europe and the Near East…

    Read More »
Close