Africa

Remains of royal ancient Egyptian artefacts uncovered in Tel Al-Pharaeen

At least one of the pieces uncovered in Kafr El-Sheikh dates to the reign of King Psamtik I

An Egyptian excavation mission has discovered remains of mud-brick walls and several artefacts that can be dated to different periods of the ancient Egyptian era as well as four furnaces from the Late Period (664-332 BCE) during excavation work carried out in Tel Al-Pharaeen archeological site known as “ancient Buto” in the Kafr Al-Sheikh Governorate.

Ayman Ashmawy, Head of the Ancient Egyptian Antiquities Sector at Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities, told Ahram Online that studies on the walls’ remains suggested that it could possibly represent the main ancient axis of the Buto temple, and the furnaces may have been used for the preparation of the offerings presented to deities inside the temple.

He continued that the mission has also uncovered the foundation of two limestone columns that may had once have been part of the temple’s hall of pillars, in addition to a limestone statue of King Psamtik I seated on the throne and holding the royal handkerchief in his right hand. The upper part of the statue is damaged, Ashmawy noted.

A part of a yet unidentified royal statue has also been found but preliminary examination suggests that it too could belong to King Psamtik I.

The statue is skillfully carved in black granite. It is missing the head, neck, and a segment below the knee, as well as the base and parts of the arms. It depicts the king wearing the Shendit (royal kilt). Both statues and their fragments were transferred to the stores of the ministry for conservation and restoration.

On his part, Hossam Ghoneim, head of the excavation mission, said that the mission uncovered the upper part of a statue of the god Hur engraved in quartzite, remains of an inscription bearing the name of the Buto, part of a granite royal hand with the remains of a royal cartouche of King Psamtik I, part of a Menit Necklace (the symbol of goddess Hathor), as well as a collection of pottery.

Via
AhramOnline
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Pasquale Barile

Pasquale Barile, freelance egyptologist and writer, deals with ancient languages and genesis of civilization. Founder and President of the Ancient World Society and HistoryLab, conducts an intensive research, divulging and teaching activity in history. He is a member of the EES (Egypt Exploration Society) and SE (Société d'Égyptologie). He lives in Bologna, Italy.

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