stone age

  • Stone age hunter-gatherers’ ‘paradise’ discovered next to major Israeli road

    Israeli archaeologists have uncovered next to one of the country’s busiest roads the site of an extraordinarily well preserved prehistoric “paradise” used by stone age hunter-gatherers over half a million years ago, who left behind evidence of hundreds of knapped flint hand-axes. The discovery at about a five-metre depth at Jaljulia, near the town of Kfar Saba, suggests that an…

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  • Ancient cave in China filled with 45,000-year-old stone tools and animal bones, new excavation reveals

    Archaeologists have recovered thousands of artifacts from a cave in Xinjiang (an autonomous region of northern China) including stone tools, bronze and iron artifacts and animal fossils. Some date as far back as the Paleolithic Age, making them roughly 45,000 years old, according to the Institute of Archaeology at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. Around 2,000 artifacts were unearthed at the…

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  • Ancient henge discovered in Yorkshire

    The circular monument lay hidden for centuries under farmland, its existence only hinted at in crop marks, spotted in aerial surveys. But over the past three months archeologists have been hard at work bringing to light what they believe could be East Yorkshire’s first Woodhenge – as in Stonehenge without the stone – at Little Catwick Quarry near Hornsea. And…

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  • Ancient Axes, Spear Points May Reveal When Early Humans Left Africa

    More than 1,000 stone artifacts, some of which may be up to 1.76 million years old, have been discovered at Wadi Dabsa, in southwest Saudi Arabia near the Red Sea. The artifacts, which were found in what is now an arid landscape, date to a time when the climate was wetter; they may provide clues as to how and when…

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  • 5,000-year-old “granary” found in east China

    A huge pile of carbonized unhusked rice dating back 5,000 years was found in the ruins of ancient Liangzhu City in eastern China’s Zhejiang Province. The pile was about 60 cm thick and covered about 5,000 square meters, the provincial institute of archaeology said Wednesday. The pile stored about 100,000 kg of carbonized rice. Liu Bin, head of the institute,…

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  • Stone Age carved rocks discovered in Bornholm

    Danes often refer to the holiday destination of Bornholm as ‘the sunshine island’, so it is only fitting that a cache of rocks carved in the Stone Age, which were recently excavated on the Danish island, have been dubbed ‘sun stones’. The small stones are covered with designs carved by Stone Age people 5,000 years ago. The approximately 300 stones and…

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  • European Hunter-Gatherers Interbred With Farmers From the Near East

    The Neolithic Period, which lasted from about 9,000 to 3,000 BC, often seems as mysterious as the famous megaliths associated with it, such as Stonehenge in England and Ggantija in Malta. It included, however, one of the most important shifts in human history: the gradual transition from hunter-gatherer groups to farming communities. Early populations from Europe and the Near East…

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  • Prehistoric menhir found near Bern

    The stone – two metres long and 1.3 metres wide, and weighing up to three tons – was found as part of excavations of a known Bronze Age site at Breitenacher near Kehrsatz on the outskirts of Bern, said the cantonal authorities in a press release. Judging by its size and shape, the stone is a menhir – a single…

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  • Orpheus’ Lyre Rock Engraving Discovered in Bulgaria’s Eastern Rhodope Mountains

    The Eagles’ Rocks near Ardino are said to be part of an ancient religious rock complex. They are not to be confused with another similar site of the same name, also in the Eastern Rhodope Mountains: the prehistoric rock shrine Orlovi Skali (“Eagles’ Rocks”) near the town of Sarnitsa, Mineralni Bani Municipality, where huge human faces hewn into the rocks…

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  • Rice so nice it was domesticated thrice

    Rice is unique among wild plants for having been domesticated independently on three continents: Asia, Africa, and now South America, researchers have discovered. The New World variety, tamed about 4000 years ago, apparently was abandoned after Europeans arrived. But its genetic legacy could potentially help improve Oryza sativa, the Asian rice species that is now a dietary staple for half…

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